Policies for Working with Youth

Salesian Society

Policies for Working with Youth

(Draft June 2017)

Download this Document as PDF

 

Child abuse is a challenge to be confronted by all who have responsibilities for children:  parents, teachers, physicians, employees and adult volunteers.  We must be able to identify child abuse when we see it, know our responsibilities to report suspected abuse, and provide supervision that will ensure that no child in our care becomes the victim of abuse through negligence or willful act while participating in a program, event or activity of the Salesian Society. Each year thousands of youth safely participate in programs designed to develop and enhance spirituality, citizenship, leadership, and life skills.  The future of these programs depends on conducting them in accordance with the policies and procedures of the Salesian Society.  The primary reason for reporting child abuse and neglect is to protect the child from further abuse.  By protecting the identified child, this may also protect other children being abused by the perpetrator(s).  In addition to protecting the child, reporting child abuse can also potentially provide help for the suspected abuser.  Reporting child abuse can be a catalyst for change in the home environment and help lower the risk of abuse in the future. 

Role of the Salesian Director, Local Economer, Employees, and Adult Volunteers

A. Salesian Directors and Local Economers are: 1) responsible for informing employees and volunteers about the procedures for reporting safety concerns and hazards.  2) responsible for interpreting Salesian Society policies regarding health and safety.
B. Salesian Directors and Local Economers must keep themselves, and all employees and volunteers, appraised of all changes in all Salesian policies and procedures.
C. Salesian Directors and Local Economers are responsible for incorporating safety into locations they oversee, and projects they develop or oversee such as activities, events, and camps.
D. Salesian Directors, Local Economers, employees and adult volunteers are responsible for the safety of children during all meetings, events and activities.
E. Salesian Directors, Local Economers, employees and volunteers must also incorporate safety awareness into all meetings and demonstrate safe practices.

II. Safe Children and the Working With Youth Policies.

A. The Safe Children and Working with Youth Policies are designed to help protect youth in a proactive manner against child abuse and/or neglect.
B. These policies are primarily for the protection of youth from abuse or neglect, but also to help all adults responsible for children to develop and maintain healthy interpersonal boundaries with children and youth.
C. The Working with Youth Policy also serves to protect staff and adult volunteers from false accusations of abuse.

III. Key Provisions of the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act

A. The intent and purpose of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act (California Penal Code Sections 11164 through 11174.31) is to protect children from abuse and neglect. All Salesian Priests and Brothers, volunteers and employees are “mandated reporters” of child abuse or neglect, as defined in Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act.  

The entire California law can be found here: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes_displayText.xhtmllawCode….

In Texas, Section 261.101 of the Texas Family Code mandates that anyone who suspects child abuse or neglect must report it immediately. The entire Texas law can be found here: http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/FA/htm/FA.261.htm.  

The following descriptions are based on the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act (California Penal Code Sections 11164 through 11174.31).

1. Definition of a Child: The Child Abuse Reporting Act defines a child as a person under 18 years of age.
2. Abuse Disclosed at 18 or older:  Accordingly, past abuse or neglect of an adult (18 years of age or older) at the time of disclosure does not warrant a suspected child abuse report. However, past abuse or neglect of an alleged victim who is still under the age of 18 would call for a mandatory report, even if the reporter is provided with information that a report has already been made sometime in the past. If a person is 18 years of age or older at the time of the disclosure and based on the information provided, there is reasonable suspicion that the alleged perpetrator is currently abusing other children or has abused a child who is still under the age of 18, a report is required. Access to children by the alleged perpetrator should not, in and of itself, constitute reasonable suspicion of child abuse. Consider the facts and surrounding circumstances to determine if one reasonably suspects abuse or neglect of children by the alleged perpetrator.  It is also important to remember that the law does not limit reporting reasonable suspicion of abuse or neglect of children only residing in California. IMPORTANT:  If there is any question about whether or not you are mandated to make a report, it is recommended that you talk with a supervisor or the Salesian Mental Health Advisor for further guidance.
3. Reasonable Suspicion:  The Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act (CANRA) requires that you make a report when you have “reasonable suspicion” of child abuse or neglect. The Act provides that “reasonable suspicion” means “that it is objectively reasonable for a person to entertain a suspicion, based upon facts that could cause a reasonable person in a like position, drawing, when appropriate, on his or her training and experience, to suspect child abuse or neglect.” The law also states that, “Reasonable suspicion” does not require certainty that child abuse or neglect has occurred nor does it require a specific medical indication of child abuse or neglect. Meaning, you are not expected to know all the facts to be true or be 100 percent sure that abuse or neglect occurred—any reasonable suspicion is sufficient to mandate a report.
4. Mandated Report: (a) Except as provided in subdivision (d), and in Section 11166.05, a mandated reporter shall make a report to an agency specified in Section 11165.9 whenever the mandated reporter, in his or her professional capacity or within the scope of his or her employment, has knowledge of or observes a child whom the mandated reporter knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of child abuse or neglect. The mandated reporter shall make an initial report by telephone to the agency immediately or as soon as is practicably possible, and shall prepare and send, fax, or electronically transmit a written followup report within 36 hours of receiving the information concerning the incident. The mandated reporter may include with the report any non-privileged documentary evidence the mandated reporter possesses relating to the incident. 
5. Reports by Clergy: A clergy member who acquires knowledge or a reasonable suspicion of child abuse or neglect during a penitential communication is not subject to this mandatory report.

 

IV. Definitions of Abuse/Types of Abuse as defined by the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act (CANRA)

A. Physical Abuse: 
1. As used in this article, the term “child abuse or neglect” includes physical injury or death inflicted by other than accidental means upon a child by another person, does not include a mutual affray between minors, does not include an injury caused by reasonable and necessary force used by a peace officer acting within the course and scope of his or her employment as a peace officer.
2. Sexual abuse as defined in Section 11165.1, neglect as defined in Section 11165.2, the willful harming or injuring of a child or the endangering of the person or health of a child, as defined in Section 11165.3, and unlawful corporal punishment or injury as defined in Section 11165.4. “Child abuse or neglect” “Child abuse or neglect”.
3. As used in this article, “the willful harming or injuring of a child or the endangering of the person or health of a child,” means a situation in which any person willfully causes or permits any child to suffer, or inflicts thereon, unjustifiable physical pain or mental suffering, or having the care or custody of any child, willfully causes or permits the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation in which his or her person or health is endangered.

B. Unlawful Corporal Punishment:
1. As used in this article, “unlawful corporal punishment or injury” means a situation where any person willfully inflicts upon any child any cruel or inhuman corporal punishment or injury resulting in a traumatic condition. It does not include an amount of force that is reasonable and necessary for a person employed by or engaged in a public school to quell a disturbance threatening physical injury to person or damage to property, for purposes of self-defense, or to obtain possession of weapons or other dangerous objects within the control of the pupil, as authorized by Section 49001 of the Education Code. It also does not include the exercise of the degree of physical control authorized by Section 44807 of the Education Code. It also does not include an injury caused by reasonable and necessary force used by a peace officer acting within the course and scope of his or her employment as a peace officer.

C. Sexual Assault and Exploitation:
1. Sexual assault refers to conduct in violation of one or more of the following sections:
a. Rape (Section 261),
b. Statutory Rape (subdivision (d) of Section 261.5)
c. Rape in Concert (Section 264.1),
d. Incest (Section 285),
e. Sodomy (Section 286),
f. Lewd or Lascivious Acts Upon a Child (subdivision (a) or (b), or paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 288),
g. Oral Copulation (Section 288a)
h. Sexual Penetration (Section 289), or
i. Child Molestation (Section 647.6).

2. Conduct described as “sexual assault” includes, but is not limited to, all of the following:
a. Penetration, however slight, of the vagina or anal opening of one person by the penis of another person, whether or not there is the emission of semen.
b. Sexual contact between the genitals or anal opening of one person and the mouth or tongue of another person.
c. Intrusion by one person into the genitals or anal opening of another person, including the use of an object for this purpose, except that, it does not include acts performed for a valid medical purpose.
d. The intentional touching of the genitals or intimate parts, including the breasts, genital area, groin, inner thighs, and buttocks, or the clothing covering them, of a child, or of the perpetrator by a child, for purposes of sexual arousal or gratification, except that it does not include acts which may reasonably be construed to be normal caretaker responsibilities; interactions with, or demonstrations of affection for, the child; or acts performed for a valid medical purpose.
e. The intentional masturbation of the perpetrator’s genitals in the presence of a child.

3. Sexual exploitation refers to any of the following:
a. Conduct involving matter depicting a minor engaged in obscene acts in violation of Section 311.2 (preparing, selling, or distributing obscene matter) or subdivision (a) of Section 311.4 (employment of minor to perform obscene acts).
b. A person who knowingly promotes, aids, or assists, employs, uses, persuades, induces, or coerces a child, or a person responsible for a child’s welfare, who knowingly permits or encourages a child to engage in, or assist others to engage in, prostitution or a live performance involving obscene sexual conduct, or to either pose or model alone or with others for purposes of preparing a film, photograph, negative, slide, drawing, painting, or other pictorial depiction, involving obscene sexual conduct. For the purpose of this section, “person responsible for a child’s welfare” means a parent, guardian, foster parent, or a licensed administrator or employee of a public or private residential home, residential school, or other residential institution.
c. A person who depicts a child in, or who knowingly develops, duplicates, prints, downloads, streams, accesses through any electronic or digital media, or exchanges, a film, photograph, videotape, video recording, negative, or slide in which a child is engaged in an act of obscene sexual conduct, except for those activities by law enforcement and prosecution agencies and other persons described in subdivisions (c) and (e) of Section 311.3. 

D. Commercial sexual exploitation refers to either of the following:
1. The sexual trafficking of a child, as described in subdivision (c) of Section 236.1.
2. The provision of food, shelter, or payment to a child in exchange for the performance of any sexual act described in this section or subdivision (c) of Section 236.1.

E. Abuse or Neglect in Out-of-Home Care:
1. As used in this article, the term “abuse or neglect in out-of-home care” includes physical injury or death inflicted upon a child by another person by other than accidental means, sexual abuse as defined in Section 11165.1, neglect as defined in Section 11165.2, unlawful corporal punishment or injury as defined in Section 11165.4, or the willful harming or injuring of a child or the endangering of the person or health of a child, as defined in Section 11165.3, where the person responsible for the child’s welfare is a licensee, administrator, or employee of any facility licensed to care for children, or an administrator or employee of a public or private school or other institution or agency.
2. “Abuse or neglect in out-of-home care” does not include an injury caused by reasonable and necessary force used by a peace officer acting within the course and scope of his or her employment as a peace officer.

F. Child Neglect:
1. As used in this article, “neglect” means the negligent treatment or the maltreatment of a child by a person responsible for the child’s welfare under circumstances indicating harm or threatened harm to the child’s health or welfare. The term includes both acts and omissions on the part of the responsible person.

a. Severe neglect: means the negligent failure of a person having the care or custody of a child to protect the child from severe malnutrition or medically diagnosed nonorganic failure to thrive. “Severe neglect” also means those situations of neglect where any person having the care or custody of a child willfully causes or permits the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his or her person or health is endangered, as proscribed by Section 11165.3, including the intentional failure to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, or medical care.
b. General neglect: means the negligent failure of a person having the care or custody of a child to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, medical care, or supervision where no physical injury to the child has occurred.

2. For the purposes of this chapter, a child receiving treatment by spiritual means as provided in Section 16509.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code or not receiving specified medical treatment for religious reasons, shall not for that reason alone be considered a neglected child. An informed and appropriate medical decision made by parent or guardian after consultation with a physician or physicians who have examined the minor does not constitute neglect. 

G. Unjustifiable Mental Suffering versus Serious Emotional Damage:
1. The Child Abuse Reporting Law defines the willful harming of a child as, “…the willful harming or injuring of a child or the endangering of the person or health of a child, means a situation in which any person willfully causes or permits any child to suffer, or inflicts thereon, unjustifiable physical pain or mental suffering, or having the care or custody of any child, willfully causes or permits the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation in which his or her person or health is endangered.”  This typically interpreted to mean mental suffering that is in conjunction with physical abuse or the deliberate terrorizing of a child and is a required report.

a. “Serious emotional damage” does not warrant a mandatory report, but may be reported at the discretion of the mandated reporter. The law defines serious emotional damage as being “…evidenced by states of being or behavior, including, but not limited to, severe anxiety, depression, withdrawal, or untoward aggressive behavior toward self or others, may make a report to an agency specified in Section 11165.9.”  Serious emotional damage typically occurs from poor parenting practices and is not necessarily intentionally inflicted to cause mental suffering. There is a very fine line between causing mental suffering and serious emotional damage.
b. In suspected instances of emotional suffering, you should exercise your professional judgment and determine if the emotional damage amounts to unjustifiable mental suffering. Consistent extreme and outrageous behavior toward a child who suffers emotional damage, such as daily, constant verbal abuse may be indicative of unjustifiable mental suffering, which would call for a mandatory report.  Consultation with your supervisor and/or the Mental Health Advisor is good practice in these situations.
c. Additionally, any person who cares for or has custody of a child, and willfully causes or permits the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation in which his or her person or health is endangered warrants a mandatory report.

V. Reporting Suspected Child Abuse (P.C. 11164-11174.4)

A. Who Must Report
1. Mandated Reporters include a list of individuals who work in social services and with children.  Examples of mandated reporters include: a teacher, an instructional aide, a teacher’s aide or teacher’s assistant employed by a public or private school, a classified employee of a public school, an administrative officer or supervisor of child welfare and attendance, or a certificated pupil personnel employee of a public or private school, and administrator of a public or private day camp, an administrator or employee of a public or private youth center, youth recreation program, or youth organization, an administrator, board member, or employee of a public or private organization whose duties require direct contact and supervision of children, including a foster family agency, an employee of a county office of education or the State Department of Education whose duties bring the employee into contact with children on a regular basis, an licensee, an administrator, or an employee of a licensed community care or child day care facility.  These are examples of mandated reporters, a full list can be found in Penal Code 11165.7. 
2. Clergy members, as specified in subdivision (d) of Section 11166, are mandated reporters of child abuse. Clergy member “means a priest, minister, rabbi, religious practitioner, or similar functionary of a church, temple, or recognized denomination or organization.”

Important:  If in doubt about whether you are a mandated reporter, the suggested course is to report if you suspect child abuse or consult with a supervisor or the Mental Health Advisor.

B. What and to Whom to Report
1. The California Child Abuse Reporting Form (see Appendix), will require that you write your name and the name and address of your agency.  Typically you report to your County Child Welfare Agency or Child Protective Services.  If you don’t know those numbers, you can ask the administrator at your school.  As an alternative you can call your local law enforcement agency - police or sheriff.  The Child Abuse Reporting form requires that you indicate the name and contact information of the agency to whom you made the report.
2. Next you will need to include the name and contact information of the victim of abuse.  You will also be asked to provide the names of the victim’s siblings (other possible victims), the victim’s parents/guardians and the name and contact information of the alleged perpetrator. You will then be asked to provide the date and location of the incident, as well as a narrative description of the incident.

C. When to Report (P.C. 11166)
1. Under the law, a mandated reporter is required to report child abuse if s/he “in his or her professional capacity, or within the scope of his or her employment has knowledge of, or observes a child whom the mandated reporter knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of child abuse or neglect” (P.C. 11166[a].). Therefore, as soon as a mandated reporter has knowledge of or observes a child whom s/he knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of child abuse or neglect, that person must make a report with Child Protective Services.  Specifically, the person reporting should contact Child Protective Services immediately or as soon as practically possible by telephone.  The person reporting the suspected abuse shall also prepare and send a written report thereof within 36 hours of receiving the information concerning the incident. (P.C. 11166[a].).
2. Mandatory reporting duties are the responsibility of the individual, and no supervisor or administrator may impede or inhibit the reporting duties.  In addition, no person making such a report shall be subject to any sanction for making the report.  Any supervisor or administrator who violates these rights of an individual to report is guilty of an infraction punishable by a fine not to exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000) (P.C. 11166.01).

D. Reporting Procedures (P.C. 11167)
1. A mandatory reporter who has knowledge of known or suspected child abuse is responsible for reporting the matter to the Child Protective Services.  The report must be made by telephone immediately and in writing within 36 hours of receiving the information concerning the incident. 
2. The report must contain the following information:

a. Name of person making report.
b. Name of the child.
c. Current address of child.
d. Nature and extent of injury.
e. Any additional information requested by the Child Protective Services.

3. The report shall be made to any police department or sheriff’s department.  Reports can be made to the county probation department, if it has been designated by the county to receive mandated reports, or the county welfare department (P.C. 11165.9).
4. Care should be exercised in how the report is made.  Report only the specific facts that have been observed.  Do not offer any conclusion as to whether or not child abuse has occurred.
5. Additionally, do not personally investigate allegations of child abuse; instead, refer them directly to the appropriate agency.
6. Under California law, reports of child abuse are confidential.  If a volunteer or other concerned party approaches you, other than the Child Protective Services or Police Department, please make the following statement:

“I am a mandated reporter, and California law clearly states that I cannot discuss any of the information on a suspected child abuse report, including who made the report.  If I discuss any information on a report with you, it is a misdemeanor crime.  If you feel a suspected child abuse report was made in error, you may contact the agency which  is investigating the report and direct all your questions to them (P.C. 11167.5[a].).”

E  Multiple Reporters (P.C. 11166[f]) 
1. When there are two or more mandated reporters who share knowledge of a known or suspected instance of child abuse, one person may be selected, by mutual agreement, to report by phone.
2. In addition, a single report may be written and signed for the group by the designated member. If that member fails to report, any other member of the group who has knowledge of this failure has the responsibility to file the report.
3. When two or more persons, one of whom is mandated to report, have suspicion of child abuse, the individual with the reporting obligation shall make the appropriate notifications.

F. Failure to Make a Report (P.C. 11166[b])
1. A mandated reporter who fails to make a required report of known or reasonably suspected child abuse or neglect is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and/or by a $1,000 fine. (P.C. 11166(b), 1.09C   Immunity, P.C. 11172(c).
2. No mandated reporter who reports a known or suspected instance of child abuse shall be civilly or criminally liable for any report required or authorized by the California Penal Code. No person who is required to file a report pursuant to the Penal Code, nor any person taking photographs at the child care custodian’s direction, shall incur any civil or criminal liability for taking photographs of a suspected victim of child abuse without parental consent or for disseminating the photographs with the report to the Child Protective Agency. 
3. Any other person, including an adult volunteer, reporting a known or suspected instance of child abuse shall not incur civil or criminal liability as a result of any report authorized by the California Penal Code, unless it can be proven that a false report was made and the person knew that the report was false or was made with reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the report.  Any such person who makes a report of child abuse known to be false or with reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the report is liable for any damages caused.

G. A Volunteers’ Responsibility to Report (PC 11165.7[b])
1. The Penal Code states that volunteers in any public or private organization who supervise children or have direct contact with them are to be provided training by the agency staff or other qualified personnel on how to identify and report child abuse or neglect.
2. If an adult volunteer suspects child abuse or neglect he/she can notify Child Protection Services or local law enforcement agencies directly.  In addition, the local director should be notified to ensure the safety of other youth.

VI. Training and Awareness of Child Abuse Reporting Procedures (P.C. 11166.5[a])

A. Training in the duties imposed by this policy and the California Penal Code shall include training for employees and adult volunteers in identifying and reporting child abuse.
B. Any employee who enters into employment on or after January 1, 1985 and who has responsibility for a youth program, shall be provided with copies of this policy, as well as links to Penal Code provisions 11165 through 11172; and shall, as a condition of employment, sign a statement that he or she has knowledge of the provisions of California Penal Code Sections 11165 through 11172, as set out in this policy, and will comply with the reporting provision.
C. The Salesian Society Office shall include this statement for signature in the employment information packet, ensure that employees sign the form, and retain the signed form in the employee’s personal files.
D. Those Salesian Members who are required to participate in Child Abuse Prevention Education activities for the local archdioceses are required to participate also in the continuing education activities required by the Salesian Safe Children and Working with Youth policies.

VIII. Safety and Preventive Actions to Protect Youth

The Salesian Society requires employees and adult volunteers to ensure a safe and secure environment which eliminates and prevents opportunities for abuse by providing good supervision, maintaining safe surroundings, and observing safety precautions.

A. Leadership:  A Minimum of Two Adults
1. Two authorized adults are required to supervise all programs, events, and activities. In general, no one-on-one interactions should occur in private.  This includes between youth and adults or among youth.  If personal discussions are needed, the discussions should be conducted in an area that is in view of other adults and youth. 
2. When transporting youth, if two adults cannot be present in the vehicle, the alternative minimum required is one adult and two or more youth.

B. Supervision of Youth
1. A youth is the responsibility OF THE adult in charge of the meeting or event until a parent/guardian or responsible adult designated by the parent/guardian arrives.
2. The youth must not be left unsupervised, transported without specific parental permission (except by law enforcement officials) or released to anyone not specifically authorized by the parent or legal guardian.
3. If parents are late or do not arrive within half an hour of the scheduled ending time, and cannot be contacted, it will be necessary for the adult volunteer or staff person in charge to contact local law enforcement officials.

C. Sleeping Facilities
1. There should be separate sleeping facilities for each gender.
2. Only adults of the same gender as the youth may supervise youth in the sleeping and restroom areas of an event.
3. No single youth is permitted to sleep in the room of an adult other than his/her own parent or guardian.

D. Restrooms
1. It is strongly suggested that separate shower and bathroom facilities be provided for mixed-gender groups.
2. When separate facilities are not available, separate times for male and female use should be scheduled and posted.

E. Respect for an Individual’s Privacy
1. Adults must respect the privacy of youth members in situations such as changing clothes and intrude only to the extent that health and safety require.
2. Adults must protect their own privacy in similar situations.

F. Youth Leader Training and Supervision
1. Youth leaders (Junior Counselors, Camp Staff, and other youth in leadership positions) will be trained as to what constitutes appropriate interaction during events and activities.
2. Staff and/or appointed adult volunteers must monitor and guide the leadership techniques used by youth leaders.

G. Constructive Discipline
1. Corporal punishment is never permitted.
2. Positive techniques of guidance, including redirection, positive reinforcement, and encouragement rather than competition, comparison, and criticism must be used.
3. Staff, adult volunteers, and youth leaders will maintain age-appropriate behavior expectations and set-up guidelines and environments that minimize the need for discipline.

H. Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco (Note: this policy does not apply to prescription medications used according to a physician’s directions)
1. Employees and volunteers shall not consume or be under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, or alcohol while performing their duties.
2. No employee or adult volunteer will allow alcohol, (use of uncontrolled substances?) illegal drugs or tobacco at any youth program, activity or event.
3. Youth programs, activities, and events are conducted under tobacco-free conditions.
4. In non-youth events and activities youth shall not handle, or in any way come in contact with alcoholic beverages, and shall be supervised while in the vicinity or area in which alcohol is present, whether as a participant, attendee, or server, and shall remain out of the area when the activity is completed.
5. In non-youth events and activities there must be adequate (at least 1 adult for every 4 youth -REMOVE), certified employees and adult volunteers on hand at the event.  Adequate assigned supervision is also defined as a certified employee or adult volunteer age 21 or older.  The assigned employee or adult volunteer shall not consume alcoholic beverages while supervising youth.
6. In non-youth events and activities the assigned employee or adult volunteer shall accept the responsibility of supervising youth who could potentially come into contact with alcoholic beverages.
7. In non-youth events and activities employees or adult volunteers shall be responsible for clearing the tables and/or service of all alcoholic beverages.
8. In non-youth events and activities it is the responsibility of the Salesian Director or Local Economer to ensure that the assigned employees or volunteers understand this policy. Adherence to the policy shall be required at any function where alcoholic beverages are served and youth are in attendance.
9. Youth, employees and adult volunteers violating this policy may face disciplinary action.

I. Transporting Youth
1. Salesian Directors and Local Economers are responsible for notifying employees and adult volunteers that they must comply with vehicular laws and regulations. This can be accomplished through newsletters, orientation meetings, and workshops.
2. Any employee or adult volunteer acting in an official capacity must follow California driving regulations and comply with all of the following standards.
3. Employees and adult volunteers who transport youth must be 21 years of age or older.
4. If driving a vehicle insured by the Salesian Society:

a. Employees and adult volunteers must complete the MVR process with the Province Office and be cleared to perform this function,
b. Have a valid California driver’s license for vehicles to be driven,
c. Have completed the fingerprint screening process with the Salesian Society.

5. If driving a personal vehicle:

a. Employees and adult volunteers must complete the MVR process with the Province Office and be cleared to perform this function by: 

b. Having a valid California driver’s license for vehicles to be driven,
c. Have on file the appropriate form to drive a personal vehicle,
d. Have car insurance as required by the state of California, and provide the Province Office with proof of this insurance,  
e. Use a safe operating vehicle, and
f. Have seat belts for each passenger.

6. When transporting youth, if two adults cannot be present in the vehicle, the alternative minimum required is one adult and two or more youth per vehicle.  An adult should not be alone with one young person (other than his/her own child) without the advance written permission of the youth’s parents.
7. Employees and adult volunteers who are transporting youth are encouraged to carry a first aid kit, and emergency accessories such as: reflectors, fire extinguishers, or other supplies, such as shovels and blankets, necessary for adverse weather conditions.
8. Employees and adult volunteers must have current permission forms and medical treatment forms signed with the original signature of the parent or guardian, and have phone access to a parent or guardian of each participating youth before transporting them in personal or Province insured vehicles to any activity or event.  This is not required for routine car-pooling of youth to and from regular activities.
9. Riding in Back of Pickup Trucks:  Passengers riding in the back of a pickup or flatbed motor truck must be secured with a restraint system, which meets or exceeds motor vehicle safety requirements.

J. Machinery
1. Employees or adult volunteers are responsible for operating or supervising the operation of machinery, vehicles, and other equipment, by youth in a responsible manner.

K. Meeting Place
1. Meetings, events and activities are often held in centers, homes, schools, churches and public buildings.
2. Employees and adult volunteers in charge should know what to do in case of an accident.
3. Emergency phone numbers should be available.
4. The location of the nearest phone should be known.
5. The location of fire extinguishers and fire alarms should be noted.

L. Emergency Medical Treatment
1. Employees and adult volunteers in charge must be able to reach the parents or guardians of all youth participating in the activity, or can produce a medical treatment form signed by the parents and/or guardians.
2. For any trip, an accompanying employee or adult volunteer must have a medical treatment form for each youth, with original signatures, in his or her possession.

M. Photo Release
1. The Salesian Society periodically uses photographs of youth, employees and adult volunteers for local, state, or international publicity.
2. A release form must be signed by the employee, adult volunteer or the parent or guardian of a youth.
3. This release allows for and assigns unlimited permission to copyright and use, publish, and republish for purposes of advertising, public relations, trade, or any other lawful use, information about them and reproduction of their likeness (photographic or otherwise) and their voice, whether or not related to any affiliation with the Salesian Society, with or without their name.
4. Individuals participating in short term activities should complete a photo release form if publicity or program pictures are taken.

N. Food Policy
1. Many locations use food related activities for fundraisers, recognition events, project activities, or other programmatic functions.
2. In planning these activities, careful attention must be given to nutrition, health, and food safety.
3. If food is to be served as part of an official activity, the food preparation and service must be in compliance with all local (city and county) health department rules and state law.
4. In addition, it is imperative that all rules and regulations governing food service activities be observed, including securing appropriate permits.
5. In use of prepackaged foods, the manufacturer assumes the legal responsibility for the product.